1. Dub Housing by Pere ubu 1978
A favourite LP by a top band.
From Wikipedia:
The title is an allusion to the echoes at rows of identical concrete public housing units in Baltimore,[5] presumably reminiscent of the echo and reverberation that characterize dub reggae. The photograph on the cover shows the apartment building on Prospect Avenue near downtown Cleveland in which members of the band lived when this album was recorded.
Robert Christgau wrote:
Because I trust the way Ubu’s visionary humor and crackpot commitment rocks out and/or hooks in for the sheer pleasure of it, I’m willing to go with their excursions into musique concrete, and on this record they get me somewhere. The death of Peter Laughner may well have deprived America of its greatest punk band, but the subsequent ascendancy of synth wizard Allen Ravenstine has defined a survival-prone community capable of bridging the ’60s and the ’80s without acting as if the ’70s never happened. Imitating randomness by tucking randomlike sounds into deep but tactfully casual structures, joyfully confusing organic and inorganic sounds, they teach us how to live in the industrial shift—imaginatively!

    Dub Housing by Pere ubu 1978

    A favourite LP by a top band.

    From Wikipedia:

    The title is an allusion to the echoes at rows of identical concrete public housing units in Baltimore,[5] presumably reminiscent of the echo and reverberation that characterize dub reggae. The photograph on the cover shows the apartment building on Prospect Avenue near downtown Cleveland in which members of the band lived when this album was recorded.

    Robert Christgau wrote:

    Because I trust the way Ubu’s visionary humor and crackpot commitment rocks out and/or hooks in for the sheer pleasure of it, I’m willing to go with their excursions into musique concrete, and on this record they get me somewhere. The death of Peter Laughner may well have deprived America of its greatest punk band, but the subsequent ascendancy of synth wizard Allen Ravenstine has defined a survival-prone community capable of bridging the ’60s and the ’80s without acting as if the ’70s never happened. Imitating randomness by tucking randomlike sounds into deep but tactfully casual structures, joyfully confusing organic and inorganic sounds, they teach us how to live in the industrial shift—imaginatively!

Notes

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