1. Between Midnight and Dawn directed by Gordon Douglas 1950
Where Danger Lives has a good review as ever:
Optimism and pessimism fight it out in Between Midnight and Dawn, an entertaining and well-crafted crime melodrama from 1950. These competing worldviews are embodied in the characters of prowl-car officers Rocky Barnes (Mark Stevens) and Dan “Pappy” Purvis (Edmond O’Brien). Having formed a friendship as Marines on Guadalcanal, the pair returns to Los Angeles and a continued partnership as cops. The laid-back and gregarious Rocky has come through his war experiences in better shape than Dan, who in typical Edmond O’Brien fashion is portrayed as bitter, cynical, and brooding. Dan has trouble seeing the world in anything other than black and white — people are either all good or all bad, as he says to Rocky in a telling early exchange, “Wait until you’ve had your fill of the scum. Slugging, knifing, shooting holes in decent people. You’ll toughen up junior.”The film opens with a solid noir sequence that finds Rocky and Dan responding to a call of suspicious activity at a warehouse. They come upon two young women in a parked car, doing a piss-poor job as lookouts for their beaus inside. Rocky and Dan put the bracelets on the girls and make for the warehouse. Inside they corner the suspects and short gunfight ensues, with Rocky forced to graze one of the youths with a shot from his service piece. Back at the station, the delinquents put on a tough act while one of the girls breaks down, pleading and “blubbering” to be let go. Though Rocky wonders about justice for a wayward teenager, it’s plain that age and gender merit no consideration with Dan — stone-faced as the hysterical girl is taken into custody, screaming over and over “I don’t want to go to jail!” as she’s dragged away.
Read in full:
http://wheredangerlives.blogspot.co.uk/2009/09/between-midnight-and-dawn-1950.html

    Between Midnight and Dawn directed by Gordon Douglas 1950

    Where Danger Lives has a good review as ever:

    Optimism and pessimism fight it out in Between Midnight and Dawn, an entertaining and well-crafted crime melodrama from 1950. These competing worldviews are embodied in the characters of prowl-car officers Rocky Barnes (Mark Stevens) and Dan “Pappy” Purvis (Edmond O’Brien). Having formed a friendship as Marines on Guadalcanal, the pair returns to Los Angeles and a continued partnership as cops. The laid-back and gregarious Rocky has come through his war experiences in better shape than Dan, who in typical Edmond O’Brien fashion is portrayed as bitter, cynical, and brooding. Dan has trouble seeing the world in anything other than black and white — people are either all good or all bad, as he says to Rocky in a telling early exchange, “Wait until you’ve had your fill of the scum. Slugging, knifing, shooting holes in decent people. You’ll toughen up junior.”


    The film opens with a solid noir sequence that finds Rocky and Dan responding to a call of suspicious activity at a warehouse. They come upon two young women in a parked car, doing a piss-poor job as lookouts for their beaus inside. Rocky and Dan put the bracelets on the girls and make for the warehouse. Inside they corner the suspects and short gunfight ensues, with Rocky forced to graze one of the youths with a shot from his service piece. Back at the station, the delinquents put on a tough act while one of the girls breaks down, pleading and “blubbering” to be let go. Though Rocky wonders about justice for a wayward teenager, it’s plain that age and gender merit no consideration with Dan — stone-faced as the hysterical girl is taken into custody, screaming over and over “I don’t want to go to jail!” as she’s dragged away.

    Read in full:

    http://wheredangerlives.blogspot.co.uk/2009/09/between-midnight-and-dawn-1950.html

Notes

  1. ratatoskm15 posted this