1. Organic Music Society by Don Cherry 1972
From dusted magazine:
This is not a jazz album. This is the music of ritual. Any resemblance it has to jazz is purely coincidental and passing. This is the sound of utopia, of equality, of the universal egalitarian dream, of the earth, the water, and the life force in all its various guises. Many jazz heads from the late 1960s and early ’70s tried to commune with this earth spirit — Sun Ra, Pharaoh Sanders, Alice Coltrane, Phil Cohran, and the Art Ensemble of Chicago come immediately to mind — but none of them ever fully escaped the aerial plane. Sun Ra was more concerned with space; Pharaoh Sanders and Alice Coltrane worked in the realm of the eternal soul; Cohran and the Art Ensemble directly transmogrified the African diaspora. On this album, however, Don Cherry wants to create a sound untethered to trivialities like place, nation or time. It is the sound of breath, community, sociality, and, most fundamentally, of people. There is little concern for audio fidelity or virtuosity. All that matters is the moment of expression, the moment of creation, and the communal space the music reveals.
http://www.dustedmagazine.com/reviews/7239
Personnel
Don Cherry - trumpet, piano, harmonium, vocals
Tommy Goldman, Tommy Koverhult - flute
Maffy Falay - trumpet
H’suan - trumpet, percussion
Hans Isgren - sarangi
Nana Vasconcelos - berimbau, percussion
Helen Eggert, Moki Cherry - tambura, vocals
Chris Bothen - doussn’gouni
Tage Siven - bass
Okay Temiz - drums
Bengt Berger - drums percussion

    Organic Music Society by Don Cherry 1972

    From dusted magazine:

    This is not a jazz album. This is the music of ritual. Any resemblance it has to jazz is purely coincidental and passing. This is the sound of utopia, of equality, of the universal egalitarian dream, of the earth, the water, and the life force in all its various guises. Many jazz heads from the late 1960s and early ’70s tried to commune with this earth spirit — Sun Ra, Pharaoh Sanders, Alice Coltrane, Phil Cohran, and the Art Ensemble of Chicago come immediately to mind — but none of them ever fully escaped the aerial plane. Sun Ra was more concerned with space; Pharaoh Sanders and Alice Coltrane worked in the realm of the eternal soul; Cohran and the Art Ensemble directly transmogrified the African diaspora. On this album, however, Don Cherry wants to create a sound untethered to trivialities like place, nation or time. It is the sound of breath, community, sociality, and, most fundamentally, of people. There is little concern for audio fidelity or virtuosity. All that matters is the moment of expression, the moment of creation, and the communal space the music reveals.

    http://www.dustedmagazine.com/reviews/7239

    Personnel

Notes

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